Slideshow shadow
by quyen

Jail Journal: Hồ Văn Oanh

August 16, 2012 in Campaigns by quyen

Guest Post by Linh Pham

One year ago – August 15, 2011 – Catholic youth activist Ho Van Oanh was arrested for advocating for greater rights and protection of mistreated workers. At age 27, he still languishes in jail, charged with Article 79: attempting to overthrow the government.

While reading about his background, I’m trying to put myself in his situation. I’m trying to imagine his fears, his confusion, his anger. After a year, does he still have optimism? Or has he given up? Is he bitter or hopeful? The following is my attempt at understanding him, through a fictional and dramatized journal that I imagine he could have written while sitting in his cell.

*August 15, 2011*
Yesterday’s event took me entirely by surprise. Seeing the man with the twisted upper lip several times was not coincidental. He turned out to be a plain-clothes policeman. After exiting my friend’s house, he and another policeman ambushed me and threw me into their car. I don’t know why I’m arrested. I screamed and told him he’s making a mistake, but that was only met with more roughness and contempt. He said if I continue to resist, I’ll be put with the worst of the prisoners. But how much worse can it get when my neighbors are thieves and violent gang members? But I stay quiet anyway. This has to be a mistake, I haven’t done anything. I don’t know why I’m here.

*August 16, 2011*
This is my third day in here, wherever here is. The concrete is cold and hard, but I still prefer it to the mattress where the smell of the last person still lingers. The inmates around me taunt and provoke me; one glance at me and they know I don’t belong here.

I prayed yesterday that Mother doesn’t know I’ve been gone yet. When I am released, there’s no need to tell her and have her worry.

*August 18, 2011*
My fears are barely containable now. I just try to continue to put my faith in God. Almost a week has passed and I am still not allowed to make a phone call or to write a letter. I can’t imagine how terrified Mother must be by now. I just wish there’s a way for me to tell her I’m fine.

From what I can piece together, I think the police detained me for my advocacy of the factory workers. I’m only a 26 year old boy who just graduated from university. I have no influence, no power. All I have experienced in life are God, family, and my studies. How can I possibly be a threat to anyone, no less the government? I pray that this is nothing more than a harsh warning and I will be released soon.

*August 23, 2011*
It’s clear at this point that my detainment is not just a mere warning. I am treated no better than the rapists and thieves in here.

I was finally given permission to call Mother to let her know where I am. I don’t have an answer for her when she asked me what I am being detained for. I tell her I will be released soon, even though I don’t know that myself. That seems to have put her at ease for now; maybe she will get a full night’s sleep since my arrest.

*September 10, 2011*
I have been asking God everyday to watch over and protect my family and me. The guard on the night shift saw me pray and it angered him so much for reasons I don’t understand. He taunts me about how God allows me to be in here. He storms into my cell and confiscates the crucifix I made from twigs and loose threads. He holds it inches in front of me and snaps it. I’ve been here for nearly a month now, and I feel like my spirit snapped with the crucifix.

*November 2, 2011*
A guard mentioned my family tried to visit me, but was turned away at the gates. He knows that I haven’t seen my family since being brought here. I don’t know if it is out of compassion or want of giving me false hope by telling me this. It’s hard to make the distinction in a place like this. In here, friendships are forged out of necessity and nothing more. Any acts of kindness come with conditions and are debts to be repaid. The few guards who are decent can turn on you the next day. Their unpredictability is troubling and heightens the anxiety in this place. There are times when I prefer the consistency of the heartless ones.

I hate it here so much. Why hasn’t God taken me out of this place? If this is a test, is He expecting me to fail first? I have not talked to Him much lately. Why should I when He has abandoned me.

*December 12, 2011*
Christmas approaches soon and I long to be with my family again. What are they doing to get me out of here? Have they given up? How about Yen Hoa parish? No letters, no visitors, no support. I’ve never felt loneliness like this before. To say my spirit is broken would be an understatement. Being broken implies there’s a possibility of piecing it back together. No, broken is the wrong word. My spirit has evaporated.

*February 15, 2012*
I have resigned to my conditions here. But after 6 months, they have allowed Anh Tu and Chi Lu to visit me briefly. Their initial expressions tell me my degrading appearance is appalling. It doesn’t matter. Just seeing them resurrects life and vitality I thought have permanently left. We agree not to lie to each other. I’m clearly not fine, and to tell Anh Chi otherwise would be entirely pointless. They tell me Mother isn’t well either. My arrest has taxed her health and they wouldn’t let her travel here in her condition. I don’t know whether to resent or commend them for doing that. Guards monitor our conversations. They forced the end of the meeting when Anh Chi told me that there people vying for my release. I don’t know who and I don’t know whether or not they will be successful. But to know I’m not forgotten allows me to hold on. I began praying again.

 

Note from the editor: 
As the one year anniversary of arrest dawns on each imprisoned activist, we will feature a guest post from student leaders around the world. Each guest post will be published on the date of arrest of each individual activist – in the form of a poem, image, blog post, or creative writing piece. We will tell the world that their work is not forgotten, that their struggle will continue on. Learn more about the “Speak Up Now!” Campaign.

by quyen

Yêu Nước Là Tội Gì?

August 2, 2012 in Campaigns by quyen

Guest Post by Lilly Ngọc Hiếu Nguyễn

Imagine this – you’re an educated 24-year-old, a devout Catholic and an active member of your community. You love to blog about social issues such as pro-life, youth activism and how China is flexing its muscles in America’s backyard. You partake in civic activities expressing your beliefs. Then one day, you get arrested! Your own government has decided to silence your voice to appease those in power. What would you do? What would you do?

This is the case of youth activist, Chu Manh Son, from Nghe An province of Vietnam. The Vietnamese authorities arrested Son on August 2, 2011 in Nghe An province. On May 25th, 2012, in two and a half hours, the People’s Court of Nghe An in Vietnam sentenced Chu Manh Son, along with three other Catholic youth, Dau Van Duong, Tran Huu Duc, and Hoang Phong. Chu Manh Son was sentenced to 36 months in prison and to be followed by 1 year of probation on charges of conducting propaganda against the State, under Article 88 of the Penal Code.

Trong lúc tôi đang hưởng thụ một mùa hè hạnh phúc trong mùa Thế Vận Hội, thì lại cảm thấy “guilty” vì hình ảnh của các tiếng nói lương tâm, nhất là các bạn trẻ cùng lứa tuổi của tôi đang phải chịu cảnh tù đày. Việt Nam là nơi tôi chào đời, được trải qua thời thơ ấu của tuổi thơ, nhưng tôi không hề nghĩ về những quyền căn bản mà gia tôi chưa hề có lúc còn bé. Tôi thường nghĩ, nếu tôi còn sống trong xã hội Việt Nam, thì cuộc sống tôi sẽ ra sao. Tôi tự hỏi rằng, “mình có vượt qua sự sợ hải như Chu Mạnh Sơn để lên tiếng vì công lý hay không? Tôi vẫn không thể khẳng định câu trả lời của mình, vì thế tôi kính phục những người gan dạ như bạn ấy.

Trong suốt quá trình lịch sử hàng nghìn năm bảo vệ và dựng nước của dân tộc Việt Nam, có bao nhiêu người trong chúng ta mang được cái hào khí của hai Bà Trưng, Bà Triệu, Thánh Gióng, Ngô Quyền, Lý Thường Kiệt, Lê Lợi, v.v…? Tại Hoa Kỳ, những vĩ nhân như Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, v.v. được lịch sử Hoa Kỳ và thế giới tôn quý vì lý tưởng tranh đấu cho sự bình đẳng.

Còn Việt Nam của chúng ta ngày nay thì sao?

Trước những sự kiện đàn áp nhân quyền đối với các phụ nữ trẻ em bị buôn ra nước ngoài, các công nhân lao động bị bóc lột, các dân oan bị mất đất đai, những ngư dân bị Trung Cộng giết hại – thì chính quyền đã làm gì trong khi những tiếng nói lương tâm lần lượt lên tiếng? Quyền căn bản con người của họ đâu mất rồi?

Bên cạnh những tên tuổi quen thuộc như blogger Điếu Cày, Tạ Phong Tần, là rất nhiều bạn trẻ lứa tuổi đôi mươi như Chu Mạnh Sơn và rất nhiều thanh niên yêu nước đang bị nhà nước Việt Nam biệt giam không được cho phép có luật sư đại diện. Họ đã bị đối xử như những tội phạm vì lý tưởng dân tộc.

Chu Mạnh Sơn và những người bạn mà tôi chưa từng được gặp mặt bao giờ – có lẽ họ đang rất cô đơn trong lao tù. Họ đã noi gương những anh hùng dân tộc, từ bỏ đời sống vô tư để hoà mình vào phong trào tranh đấu cho quyền lợi chung của đất nước. Đối với tôi, họ là những anh hùng dân tộc!

Chúng ta có thể làm gì để chia sẻ những khó khăn mà Chu Mạnh Sơn và các người yêu nước phải chịu đựng? Xin mời các bạn trẻ và mọi người cùng tham gia chiến dịch Phải Lên Tiếng (http://phailentieng.lenduong.net/) để hỗ trợ tinh thần của họ qua các hoạt động như viết thư ủng hộ họ. Chúng ta cũng có thể vận động cộng đồng thế giới, các dân cử đại diện chúng ta khắp mọi nơi để tiếng nói của chúng ta được thống nhất qua những hành động thiết thực.

Tôi mong rằng, một ngày nào đó, tôi sẽ có cơ hội được gặp Chu Mạnh Sơn…ở một quán café nào đó để chia sẻ những ước mơ và cùng nhau góp sức cho quê hươngViệt Nam.

 

Note from the editor: 
As the one year anniversary of arrest dawns on each imprisoned activist, we will feature a guest post from student leaders around the world. Each guest post will be published on the date of arrest of each individual activist – in the form of a poem, image, blog post, or creative writing piece. We will tell the world that their work is not forgotten, that their struggle will continue on. Learn more about the “Speak Up Now!” Campaign.

by quyen

Stress and Solidarity

August 2, 2012 in Campaigns by quyen

Guest post by Quyen Ngo

My eye’s been twitching for a few days now. I’ve been tweeting about it because it’s annoying and I couldn’t figure out why. I dont feel stressed… yes, I’ve been traveling, but I’ve been happy and inspired recently, not really stressed. I was sleep deprived but then I slept it off and I had a little bit of time to chill. In other words, my troubles are not much.

This morning, when it hit me that it has been a year since the arrest of Đậu Văn Dương, I sat back and thought “Oh… maybe that’s why my eye has been twitching. ‘Cause I’ve been thinking about these youth imprisoned in Vietnam.” Just the other day I was thinking about how these activists have been in jail for almost a year. Exactly one day after this thought crossed my mind, I find out that Tạ Phong Tần’s mom self-immolated while she was in jail. She probably still has no idea. Just as Paulus Lê Sơn’s mom passed away without his knowledge. He wasn’t present at her funeral. He still doesn’t know.

Đậu Văn Dương is among one of the few first youth activists who were arrested last summer. He was arrested on the 3rd of August, the 2nd where I am. He was also one of the first of the series of arrests who I read about, to learn of his work and who he is. And then it hits me again:

It’s been a year now.

This young man, so close to my age, has spent a year in prison now. He’s of the first four of the 18 imprisoned activists who went to trial this past May. Most of them have not even been tried. Alongside Tran Huu Duc, 24, Chu Manh Son, 23, and Hoang Phong, 25, he was tried and sentenced for passing out leaflets calling for a provincial election boycott. He got three-and-a-half years in prison and another one-and-a-half years probation after serving his jail term. Let me just make this clear–this man was arrested and charged for passing out words against an election under a single party state in which free election is an illusion. Your eye twitching yet?

I have friends and acquaintances who have been locked up here in America for committing horrific crimes–harming bodies and minds, and I’ve known people who’ve served time for selling drugs or getting caught with substances. Honestly, they served around the same amount of time in jail, or less. Đậu Văn Dương is in jail for speaking up and for engaging with the issues existent in his society. I’m not going to say that some pieces of paper are insignificant, because they aren’t. Words and ideas are powerful. And it is because they are powerful that it is especially important that they are allowed to flourish. To repress such is to repress one of the most beautiful aspects of our human existence–open expression, the sharing of thoughts and ideas.

I get depressed amidst apathy among my own generation, but I accept it most of the time. I accept that some people simply don’t want to spend their time fighting for social justice; I accept that that’s something that we can’t change. What I don’t accept is when the opposite happens: when young people are inspired to take action, and it is shut down. The beauty of being empowered to speak up is coupled with the human right–the freedom to do so. This freedom is crucial because when you speak up, you encounter like minded folks who are also empowered–together, this is how we find solidarity with the passionate, the bold. I get depressed when an individual is banned from solidarity, but I’m not sure how to work around this one.

I recently witnessed solidarity at UNAVSA-9, a North American Vietnamese Youth Conference. Young people inspired to take action. Laughter, love, the feeling of purpose, the feeling that we all try–we’re all trying. Đậu Văn Dương was inspired to take action. So he did.

 

Solidarity is tough to find in a jail cell.

 

A family member of one of the youth speaks about the day of the trial:

Mắt tôi bị giựt mấy ngày rồi.  Tôi phải gởi qua tweet chuyện này bởi
vì nó làm tôi bực mình và tôi không hiểu vì sao.  Tôi không thấy bị
stressed … Đúng, tôi đang phải đi xa, nhưng tôi rất hạnh phúc và hứng
chí chứ không phải stress.  Có bị thiếu ngủ nhưng đã ngủ bù và cũng có
chút thì giờ để nghỉ ngơi.  Nói cách khác, tôi chẳng có gì đáng phàn
nàn.

Sáng nay, khi sực nhớ rằng đã đúng một năm từ ngày Đậu Văn Dương bị
bắt, tôi vụt nghĩ “À, chắc đây là điềm máy mắt đây” bởi vì tôi đã và
đang nghĩ về những thanh niên đang bị tù tại Việt Nam.  Ngày nọ tôi
nghĩ đến những người này đã bị giam gần một năm.  Đúng cái ngày ý nghĩ
này đến với tôi, thì tôi lại nhận được tin tự thiêu của mẹ Tạ Phong
Tần khi blogger này vẫn đang còn ở trong tù.  Bà có lẽ vẫn chưa hay
tin.  Cũng như Paulus Lê Sơn, mẹ mất mà cũng chẳng hay.  Anh đã không
dự đám tang của mẹ và đến nay cũng chẳng biết điều này.

Đậu Văn Dương là một trong những nhà hoạt động trẻ bị bắt mùa hè năm
ngoái.  Anh ấy bị bắt ngày 3 tháng 8 và là một trong đợt người bị bắt
mà tôi được đọc và tìm hiểu thêm về thân thế cũng như việc anh đã làm.
Và ý tưởng lại ụp xuống tôi lần nữa: vậy là đã một năm rồi.

Người thanh niên này, chỉ trạc tuổi tôi, đã ở tù một năm rồi.  Anh ấy
là một trong bốn người trong số 18 nhà hoạt động bị đem ra xử tháng
Năm vừa qua.  Hầu hết những người còn lại vẫn chưa bị xử.  Cùng với
Trần Hữu Đức, 24, Chu Mạnh Sơn, 23, và Hoàng Phong, 25, anh đã bị buộc
tội tán phát truyền đơn kêu gọi tẩy chay cuộc bầu cử tại địa phương.
Anh bị xử tù 3 năm rưỡi và một năm rưỡi quản chế sau khi mãn tù.  Để
tôi nói lại cho rõ – người thanh niên này bị bắt vào tù chỉ vì chuyển
đi các giòng chữ chống lại cuộc bầu cử trong một chế độ độc đảng nơi
mà bầu cử tự do chỉ là ảo ảnh.  Bạn đã máy mắt chưa?

Tôi có bạn và người quen bị tù ở Mỹ vì đã phạm những tội ghê gớm -
làm tổn hại thân thể và tinh thần người khác.  Tôi cũng biết những
người đi tù vì bán hay cất giữ ma túy.  Thực tình họ cũng bị xử tù với

cùng thời gian như vậy hay ít hơn.  Đậu Văn Dương bị đi tù chỉ vì dám

lên tiếng và quan tâm đến những vấn đề xã hội nơi anh sống.  Tôi không

cho rằng các mảnh giấy là không đáng kể, bởi vì nó có sức mạnh.  Những chữ

và ý tưởng có sức mạnh của nó.  Và bởi vì nó có sức mạnh, điều quan trọng là

làm sao cho những ngôn từ và ý tưởng được phép nẩy nở.  Bóp nghẹt nó

chính là bóp nghẹt một khía cạnh đẹp nhất của loài người – quyền chia xẻ

tư tưởng, ý kiến và trao đổi rộng mở.
Tôi rất buồn khi thấy sự vô cảm của những người trong chính thế hệ của

mình, nhưng hầu hết tôi chấp nhận sự kiện đó.  Tôi chấp nhận rằng có người

đơn giản ra là không muốn bỏ thì giờ để tranh đấu chống lại những bất công

của xã hội; Tôi chấp nhận rằng đó là điều mà chúng ta chẳng thể thay đổi.

Cái mà tôi không thể chấp nhận chính là điều ngược lại:  khi mà những

người trẻ có một niềm tin để hành động, và lại bị bóp nghẹt.  Cái đẹp của sự

dám lên tiếng gắn liền với quyền con người – tự do được phát biểu.

Cái tự do này là then chốt vì khi bạn lên tiếng, bạn sẽ gặp những người

chia xẻ cùng một ý tưởng và đó chính là chúng ta đã tìm được sự đoàn kết

của những người có nhiệt huyết và dũng cảm.  Tôi rất buồn khi một cá nhân

bị ngăn cấm tham gia vào sự kết đoàn đó nhưng tôi không biết cách nào

để giải quyết.

Tôi gần đây đã chứng kiến sự đoàn kết này ở UNAVSA-9, Hội Nghị

Thanh Niên Việt Nam Bắc Mỹ.  Những người trẻ có sự phấn khởi

để hành động.  Cười đùa, yêu thương, cảm thấy cuộc đời được định hướng,

cái cảm giác mà chúng ta cố gắng để có – tất cả chúng ta đều đang cố gắng.

Đậu Văn Dương đã có sự phấn khởi để hành động.  Và anh ấy đã làm.

 

Sự đoàn kết thật là khó tìm ở trong buồng giam của trại tù.

 

Note from the editor: 
As the one year anniversary of arrest dawns on each imprisoned activist, we will feature a guest post from student leaders around the world. Each guest post will be published on the date of arrest of each individual activist – in the form of a poem, image, blog post, or creative writing piece. We will tell the world that their work is not forgotten, that their struggle will continue on. Learn more about the “Speak Up Now!” Campaign.

by quyen

A poem dedicated to Tran Huu Duc

August 2, 2012 in Campaigns by quyen

A poem by Tam Nguyen, commemorating a year since the arrest of Tran Huu Duc.

Twenty-four years old

Repressed for being so bold,

After advocating for orphans and the poor

Never wanting anything more.

 

Hands outstretched not turning a cheek,

Unsung actions to help the weak…

Under the eye of a power that has reached its peak.

 

Dare to speak up, dare to fight

Until freedom and human rights

Can always be seen in sight.

 

Note from the editor: 
As the one year anniversary of arrest dawns on each imprisoned activist, we will feature a guest post from student leaders around the world. Each guest post will be published on the date of arrest of each individual activist – in the form of a poem, image, blog post, or creative writing piece. We will tell the world that their work is not forgotten, that their struggle will continue on. Learn more about the “Speak Up Now!” Campaign.

by quyen

One Year Since the Arrest of Dang Xuan Dieu

July 30, 2012 in Campaigns by quyen

Guest Post by Don Le

Note from the editor: 
As the one year anniversary of arrest dawns on each imprisoned activist, we will feature a guest post from student leaders around the world. Each guest post will be published on the date of arrest of each individual activist – in the form of a poem, image, blog post, or creative writing piece. We will tell the world that their work is not forgotten, that their struggle will continue on. Learn more about the “Speak Up Now!” Campaign.

by quyen

Nguyen Van Oai was arrested a year ago today

July 30, 2012 in Campaigns by quyen

 

Guest post by May Tran

One year ago, Nguyen Van Oai, was one of the first three young activists to be arrested in a large crackdown on 18 human rights defenders in Vietnam.

A member of the Most Holy Redeemer Congregation and Yen Ha Parish, Nguyen Van Oai was also a factory worker rights activists, and a reporter and citizen journalist. Vietnamese police raided his home on August 3rd, 2011. He is currently detained at the B14 Detention Center in Thanh Tri Hanoi.

July 30th, 2012 marks the first anniversary of this crackdown. All were arbitrarily arrested, without warrants, nor notice to their families. It is appalling that one year has already passed with all of these activists still detained, many without access to legal representation.

It is very difficult for those living under oppressive regimes to speak up. Those of us who live in places where we are able to, should be the voices for those who cannot. Human rights is something we must all protect.

Today, I urge you to take action. Activists, like Nguyen Van Oai, deserve to be recognized as contributing members of society. They are not dangerous “terrorists” who are trying to overthrow the government. They’ve participated in anti-China protests to protect the sovereignty of our homeland and they participate in activities that improve the country overall, such as factory worker rights.

You can take action by raising awareness within your circles, and joining the “Speak Up Now!” campaign, a call-to-action that brings attention to all imprisoned Vietnamese human rights defenders and works to mobilize the international community to call for their freedom.

Note from the editor: 
As the one year anniversary of arrest dawns on each imprisoned activist, we will feature a guest post from student leaders around the world. Each guest post will be published on the date of arrest of each individual activist – in the form of a poem, image, blog post, or creative writing piece. We will tell the world that their work is not forgotten, that their struggle will continue on. Learn more about the “Speak Up Now!” Campaign.

by trinh

SPEAK UP NOW! CAMPAIGN: “ONE YEAR COMMEMORATION”

July 26, 2012 in Campaigns, Press Release by trinh

For Immediate Release

Contact: 202-596-7951 | [email protected]

SPEAK UP NOW! CAMPAIGN: “ONE YEAR COMMEMORATION”
Under dictatorial rule, the Vietnamese government has ignored the rights of its people, leaving youth activists without a place to stand.

July 30, 2012 marks the one year anniversary of the Vietnamese Communist government’s arbitrary detention of many Vietnamese youth activists.

Chu Manh Son, Dang Xuan Dieu, Dau Van Duong, Ho Duc Hoa, Ho Van Oanh, Nguyen Van Duyet, Nguyen Van Oai, Nguyen Xuan Anh, Nong Hung Anh, Thai Van Dung, Tran Huu Duc, Tran Minh Nhat, Ta Phong Tan, Tran Vu Anh Binh, Nguyen Dinh Cuong, Nguyen Hoang Phong, Vo Minh Tri, and Paulus Le Son are students, bloggers, and artists with a passion to improve Vietnam. They served as activists and community organizers working for the protection of human rights and social justice, including such wide-ranging issues as opposition to bauxite mining, land-grabs, Chinese encroachment on Vietnamese territories; advocacy for labor rights and access to education.

Nearly ten months after being detained, four out of the eighteen activists were put on trial, while the others continue to be imprisoned without due process. On May 24, 2012, the People’s Court in Nghe An Province charged Dau Van Duong, Tran Huu Duc, Chu Manh Son and Nguyen Hoang Phong with Article 88 (“propaganda”). Many of the other seventeen youth activists are charged with violating Article 88 and Article 79 (“subversion”) of Vietnam’s penal code. All of these youth activists are still being detained arbitrarily with limited access to legal representation.

One year since these youth activists have been unjustly detained, Professor Allen Weiner, director of the Stanford Program in International and Comparative Law at Stanford Law school, filed a petition to the United Nations Working Group on Arbitrary Detention. The title of the petition is “In the Matter of Francis Xavier DANG Xuan Dieu et al. v. Government of the Socialist Republic of Viet Nam.” Professor Weiner asserts that the Hanoi regime’s arbitrary detention of these activists is a violation of international law.

The Len Duong International Vietnamese Youth Network recognizes that this is an important moment where we must support Professor Allen Weiner and all human rights organizations that oppose the Vietnamese government’s practice of arbitrary detention to repress and silence voices of conscience.

Vietnamese youth organizations around the world will continue to work together on the “Speak Up Now!” Campaign. We support all Vietnamese human rights defenders and will mobilize the international community to call for their freedom.

Vietnamese Youths, together, we must Speak Up!

 ###

The Len Duong International Vietnamese Youth Network was founded in 1999 at our first conference in Melbourne, Australia by student and youth leaders with a passion for a better Vietnam. Since then, Len Duong continually strives to provide an engaging and collaborative environment for Vietnamese youths across the world to partake in dialogue and utilize their skills and knowledge to contribute to society. Len Duong is proud of our progress in providing a deeper understanding on Vietnam human rights issues as we continue to advocate for those who are disenfranchised.

by quoc

CHIẾN DỊCH PHẢI LÊN TIẾNG: “ĐÁNH DẤU MỘT NĂM”

July 26, 2012 in Campaigns, lên đường, Thông Cáo Báo Chí by quoc

Xin Phổ Biến Gấp
Liên Lạc: 202-596-7951
Ngày 26 tháng 7 năm 2012
[email protected]
 

CHIẾN DỊCH PHẢI LÊN TIẾNG: “ĐÁNH DẤU MỘT NĂM”
Chế độ độc tài đã bỏ quên quyền lợi của dân tộc và các thanh niên yêu nước không còn chỗ đứng trong xã hội Việt Nam

Ngày 30 tháng 7 năm 2012 đánh dấu một năm sự kiện nhiều thanh niên yêu nước đã bị nhà cầm quyền Cộng Sản Việt Nam bắt giữ hàng loạt và giam cầm một cách tuỳ tiện.

 Các anh chị: Chu Mạnh Sơn, Đặng Xuân Diệu, Đậu Văn Dương, Hồ Đức Hòa, Hồ Văn Oanh, Nguyễn Văn Duyệt, Nguyễn Văn Oai, Nguyễn Xuân Anh, Nông Hùng Anh, Thái Văn Dung, Trần Hữu Đức, Trần Minh Nhật, Tạ Phong Tần, Trần Vũ Anh Bình, Nguyễn Đình Cương, Nguyễn Hoàng Phong, Võ Minh Trí và Paulus Lê Sơn là những thanh niên sinh viên, blogger, nghệ sĩ đầy lý tưởng, muốn tranh đấu cho một tương lai tốt đẹp trên đất nước Việt Nam. Họ đã tham gia nhiều công việc thiện nguyện, chống khai thác bôxít,  bảo vệ quyền lợi công nhân và bày tỏ lòng yêu nước qua việc tham gia biểu tình chống Trung Quốc xâm lược.

Gần mười tháng sau khi bị bắt, ngày 24 tháng 05 năm 2012, Tòa án Nhân dân tỉnh Nghệ An đã tuyên án một cách vô lý và bất công đối với các anh Đậu Văn Dương, Trần Hữu Đức, Chu Mạnh Sơn và Nguyễn Hoàng Phong.

Suốt 12 tháng qua, các anh chị nêu trên đã và đang bị đày đọa trong cảnh tù biệt giam với tội danh theo điều 88 và 79 của Bộ Luật Hình Sự. Họ không hề được quyền tiếp xúc với luật sư đại diện. Họ đang bị tước đoạt cả những quyền căn bản nhất của con người mà cả nhân loại đã công nhận.

Trong ngày đánh dấu một năm sự kiện bắt giam hàng loạt các thanh niên yêu nước cực kỳ bất công, Giáo sư Allen Weiner – thuộc Phân Khoa Luật của Đại Học Stanford, một trong những trường đại học hàng đầu của Hoa Kỳ - đã đại diện cho các anh chị nêu trên đệ đơn lên Ủy Ban Liên Hiệp Quốc Điều Tra về Bắt Người Tuỳ Tiện (United Nations Working Group on Arbitrary Detention). Giáo sư Weiner khẳng định rằng việc tuỳ tiện bắt giữ các thanh niên này là những hành vi chà đạp nhân quyền trầm trọng của nhà nước CHXHCNVN.

Mạng Lưới Tuổi Trẻ Việt Nam Lên Đường nhận thấy đây là lúc rất cần thiết phải lên tiếng ủng hộ và tiếp tay với Giáo sư Allen Weiner và các tổ chức quốc tế đang phản đối tình trạng vi phạm nhân quyền tại Việt Nam. Nhà cầm quyền Việt Nam đang lạm dụng các điều luật an ninh quốc gia lỗi thời của Bộ Luật Hình Sự để trấn áp các tiếng nói lương tâm và giam cầm những người hết lòng yêu nước thương dân.

  • Chúng tôi kính kêu gọi đồng bào khắp nơi tiếp tay phổ biến tài liệu đơn khởi kiện của Giáo sư Allen Weiner đến với gia đình và bạn hữu

Các đoàn thể thanh niên sinh viên Việt Nam trên khắp thế giới đã và đang liên kết trong Chiến Dịch Phải Lên Tiếng sẽ tiếp tục hỗ trợ tinh thần cũng như vận động cộng đồng quốc tế lên tiếng cho sự tự do vô điều kiện của các thanh niên yêu nước.

Tuổi Trẻ Việt Nam, chúng ta Phải Lên Tiếng!

Tình Đoàn Kết Không Biên Giới

February 11, 2012 in Campaigns, lên đường, Thông Cáo Báo Chí by lenduong

SBTN Poster

by quoc

Chiến dịch gửi Bưu Thiếp “Phải Lên Tiếng”

November 10, 2011 in Campaigns, lên đường, Thông Cáo Báo Chí by quoc

Hãy bầy tỏ cảm tình của chúng ta đối với các thanh niên Công giáo bị Nhà Cầm Quyền CSVN bắt giữ bằng cách gửi bưu thiếp hỗ trợ về cho họ. Sau đây là địa chỉ gia đình của các thanh niên bị bắt và địa chỉ các cơ sở công giáo có thể giúp chuyển thông tin đến các thanh niên này.

ĐỊA CHỈ LIÊN LẠC VỚI NGƯỜI NHÀ CÁC THANH NIÊN BỊ BẮT

Anh Chu Mạnh Sơn
Bố: Ông Chu Văn Nghiêm
Địa chỉ liên hệ: Xóm 12B xã Phúc Thành – huyện Yên Thành – tỉnh Nghệ An.

 

Anh Đặng Xuân Diệu
Me: Bà Nguyễn Thị Nga
Địa chỉ liên lạc: Xóm 4 xã Nghi Đồng – huyện Nghi Lộc – tỉnh Nghệ An.

 

Anh Đậu Văn Dương
Bố: Ông Đậu Văn Lai
Địa chỉ liên hệ: Xóm 4 xã Nam Lộc – huyện Nam Đàn – tỉnh Nghệ An.

 

Anh Hồ Đức Hòa
Bố: Ông Hồ Đức Hiền
Địa chỉ liên hệ: Xóm 4 xã Quỳnh Vinh – huyện Quỳnh Lưu – tỉnh Nghệ An.

 

Anh Hồ Văn Oanh
Mẹ: Bà Vũ Thị Loan
Địa chỉ liên hệ: Xóm 4 xã Quỳnh Vinh – huyện Quỳnh Lưu – tỉnh Nghệ An.

 

Anh Lê Văn Sơn
Mẹ: Bà Đỗ Thị Tần
Địa chỉ liên hệ: Thôn 2 – Trinh Hà, xã Hoàng Trung – Hoàng Hóa – Thanh Hóa.

 

Anh Nguyễn Văn Oai
Mẹ: Bà Trần Trị Liệu
Địa chỉ liên hệ: Xóm 4 xã Quỳnh Vinh – huyện Quỳnh Lưu – tỉnh Nghệ An.

 

Anh Nguyễn Văn Duyệt
Bố: Ông Nguyễn Văn Chức
Địa chỉ liên lạc: Xóm 4 xã Quỳnh Vinh – huyện Quỳnh Lưu – tỉnh Nghệ An.

 

Anh Nguyễn Xuân Anh
Vợ:  Chị Nguyễn Thị Oanh
Địa chỉ liên lạc: Xóm 4 xã Nghi Phú – TP Vinh – tỉnh Nghệ An

 

Anh Nông Hùng Anh
Bố: Ông Nông Văn Khoa
Địa chỉ liên hệ: Ngõ 10, khối 9, Phường Hoàng Văn Thụ, TP Lạng Sơn.

 

Anh Thái Văn Dung
Mẹ: Bà Hàn Thị Phú
Địa chỉ liên hệ: Xóm 4 xã Diễn Hạnh – huyện Diễn Châu – tỉnh Nghệ An.

 

Anh Trần Hữu Đức
Bố:  Ông Trần Đức Trường
Địa chỉ liên hệ: Xóm 4 xã Nam Lộc – huyện Nam Đàn – tỉnh Nghệ An.

 

Anh Trần Minh Nhật
Bố: Ông Trần Khắc Chín
Địa chỉ liên hệ: Thôn Yên Thành, Xã Đà Đơn, huyện Lâm Hà – Lâm Đồng

 

ĐỊA CHỈ  CÁC CƠ SỞ TÔN GIÁO NHỜ LIÊN LẠC VỚI CÁC THANH NIÊN BỊ BẮT

Giáo Phận Vinh
Giám mục Phaolô Nguyễn Thái Hợp
Địa chỉ: VĂN PHÒNG TGM XÃ ĐOÀI
Nghi Diên – Nghi Lộc – Nghệ An

 

Giáo Phận Hà Nội
Tổng Giám Mục Phêrô Nguyễn Văn Nhơn
Địa chỉ: Toà Tổng Giám Mục Hà Nội
Số 40 phố Nhà Chung – Hoàn Kiếm – Hà Nội

 

Dòng Chuá Cứu Thế Việt Nam
Bề trên Giám tỉnh: Cha Vinh Sơn Phạm Trung Thành
Địa chỉ: 38 Kỳ Đồng, Phường 9, Quận 3, Sài Gòn

 

Nhà thờ Thái Hà
180/2 Nguyễn Lương Bằng, Đống Đa, Hà Nội.